Macha Besara- Fish cooked in mustard gravy

Fish has always plays a predominant role in odiya cuisine as this beautiful coastal state has the Bay of Bengal on one side and many rivers and it’s tributaries cross their path across the State. The presence of these water bodies makes way for huge varieties of fishes available to the local people. It is no surprise why fish is a staple diet for many odias like me. The local markets here is flooded with many varieties of fish like Rohi( Rohu or Ruhi), Bhakura(Catla), Ilisi(Hilsa or Ilish), Mirikali, Pohala, Chandi, Magura in the morning and it is a common…

Noroxingho Maasor Anja-Assamese styled Fish Curry with Curry Leaves( Guest Post By Pushpita Ahibam)

Pushpita Aheibam, an Economist by qualification, a freelance writer by profession, a homemaker, a mother and last but not the least a food enthusiast and a dear friend of mine has an amazing Blog Ei Gi Chakhum where she shares her passion for cooking , sharing, reviving & spreading some inherited authentic Manipuri cuisine along with fusion cuisine . I always like the detailed infromation she shares about the recipes and some of my favourites from her Blog is Thandai Souffle, Yongchak Singju,Crispy Chicken Drumsticks/Legs, Kelichana Shots,Butter Garlic Prawns to name a few. It is absolute pleasure to have her…

Macha Tarkari( Odia style Rohu Fish Curry)

Odisha, previously known as Orissa, is one state that is traditionally famous for it’s mouth watering delicacies of rice, lentils, desserts and sea food.Odia cuisine is known for its simplicity and delicate treatment of various ingredients that goes into it. Odisha has a vast coast line along the Bay of Bengal and also has many rivers flowing within the State. Owing to this proximity, access to riverine fish and its inclusion has become an inevitable part of Odia cuisine and majority of the people from Odisha are non-vegetarians and fish forms an integral part of their traditional cuisine. Fresh water…

PATRANI MACHCHI

Imagine a fish that is coated in coconut chutney, wrapped in banana leaves and steamed, this dish is one of the hallmarks ofParsicuisine – influenced by the fine blend of Gujarati and Persian cooking. No Parsi celebration is complete without their most famous and mouthwatering dish Patra ni Machhi, which literally means fish in leaves, and in this case refers to pomfret wrapped in a banana leaf. It is an absolute standard on every Parsi festive menu and must come from the community”s seafaring and coastal days. Parsis are a community of Zoroastrians who made their home in the western…

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